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Software developer #Go #CommonLisp #JS #SQL. #LispWorks user. Soft spots for #Emacs #SmallWeb. Recently becoming #OpenBSD enthusiast.

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Safari on Desktop plays a particularly bad role in terms of accessibility, despite Apple’s commitment to it.

HTML5 defines a number of specialized <input> elements, like a date picker. That is one of the most neglected elements in Safari, as can be seen in this screenshot.

Not only is Safari’s version utterly ugly, it also lacks common features like jumping to a different month or going back to the default date. Also, it doesn’t mark dates that are outside of the defined (min) and (max) ranges.

This is like some employee at Apple had a task to create this element 20 years ago and never looked back at it.

<select> elements are also bad. They are almost impossible to style, the font size is too small and its blue-themed arrows are a needle in the eye of every web designer.

This is the reason why many web devs revert to some bloated JavaScript plugins that have almost zero support for accesibility and don’t work at mobile as they should.

So if any Apple dev is reading this: please make a point about this in the Safari Desktop dev team (if such a thing still exists). Safari could do much better here.

#Webdev #Safari #Apple

A screenshot that compares the HTML date input element shown in Firefox, Chrome and Safari. Also, there are several input dropbown elements shows in both browsers.
A screenshot that compares the HTML date input element shown in Firefox, Chrome and Safari. Also, there are several input dropbown elements shows in both browsers.
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